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Members’ Publications

Our members publish widely in the local and international press on issues of concern to the public as well as professional colleagues. Here is a sampling of some recent publications:

Author(s): Christian J. Churchill
Co-Authors: Gordon Fellman
Publisher: International Forum of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 2017

Abstract: This paper posits that an infusion of psychoanalytic concepts into the teaching of sociology in undergraduate liberal arts curricula offers a route to expanding students’ understanding of how self and society are entwined in a condition of mutual crisis in contemporary society. We argue that the liberatory project at the core of the liberal arts is served well by linking the critical perspectives found in these two disciplines. We provide as specific examples from our own teaching: (1) a demonstration of how Freud’s concept of neurosis has an affinity with Marx’s concept of alienation; and (2) a discussion of how the torture sequence in Orwell’s 1984 presents an inversion of a psychoanalytic treatment through which the power of propaganda is illuminated. We conclude that teaching the two disciplines in tandem helps students grasp how the self is a socially constructed entity and how the orthodoxies of neurosis and social control are available for critique and change.

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman
Publisher: Karnac (forthcoming)
Publication Year: 2015
Author(s): Helen K. Gediman
Publisher: Karnac (forthcoming) Chapter in book, T. McBride and M. Murphy eds. Trauma, Destruction and Transformative Potential
Publication Year: 2015
Author(s): Christian J. Churchill
Publisher: International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies
Publication Year: 2015

This paper uses the interactive performance play Sleep No More and William Shakespeare's Macbeth as bases for exploring the experience of depressive stasis. Freud's “Mourning and Melancholia” is used as a means of interpreting these works. Through the dramatic portraits of the self turned destructively upon itself found in these plays, psychoanalysis is offered as a way of imagining how grief and loss can be experienced as annihilating rather than transformative. At the core of Freud's essay is the idea that for the melancholic, time feels stuck. This paper posits that Sleep No More and Macbeth illuminate how we can think about patients in this condition and how we might try to grasp their experience of feeling like time has stopped and that hope is therefore lost.

Author(s): Jerome S Blackman
Publisher: Karnac
Publication Year: 2014

The disciple, in search of meaning, approaches the Zen master. The Zen master tests him: “What is reality?” The disciple responds, “Reality is an internal construction. Reality is the manifestation of mental aggregations. Reality is your mind’s personal creation.” The Zen master then takes a stick and smacks the disciple on the head.
Not to belabor the point, when we speak of fear of physical injury, we are dealing both with reality and fantasy. Sometimes it is difficult to distinguish between the two. Yet, in our everyday lives, we see the operation of the reality principle (Freud, 1920; Schur, 1966). We could not drive on the highway if we did not trust that other people did not want to be physically injured. We rely on the idea that the vast majority of human beings possess a self-preservation function that leads them to try to avoid automobile accidents. We drive “defensively.” On the other hand, there are people who are afraid to drive an automobile, or even get into one, citing the average of about 40,000 deaths per year in auto accidents in the U.S. How realistic are they?
To begin, let’s start with some considerations about how fear of physical injury develops throughout childhood and adolescence, in both boys and girls. Although a vast topic, I will try to touch on some of the nodal points in development that contribute both to reality testing of physical danger and to inhibition and symptom formation (Freud, 1926). Then, after examining some clinical examples, we’ll take a look at how diagnosis and treatment selection are affected. Finally, we can take a brief look at cultural, national, and international implications of this ubiquitous fear.

Also presented 2008-2013
Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2014

American Psychoanalytical Association Annual Mtg, New York

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Publication Year: 2014
Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2014

IPA-COWAP, "Myth of the Mighty Woman", NY

When career counseling is not enough
Author(s): Friedman, Lynn
Publisher: Career Convergence, National Career Development Association
Publication Year: 2014

Career counseling is effective for most clients. However, some unconsciously undermine the process. Why do these clients engage in self-sabotage? How can they be understood and helped? The author presents a model for psychoanalytically-informed career assessment and describes how this approach can lead to useful recommendations for career assistance.

From the Faraway Nearby
Author(s): Anne Adelman & Kerry Malawista
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Publication Year: 2013
Author(s): Harriet Basseches, Paula Ellman and Nancy Goodman, Editors
Publisher: Karnac Press
Publication Year: 2013
Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Publisher: Jason Aronson, NY, 2013 and Korea, 2015
Publication Year: 2013
Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2013

IPTAR Scientific Conference, "Is Anatomy Still Destiny?", New York

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2013

American Institute for Psychoanalysis, NY

Solutions to 101 Tricky Problems in Psychotherapy
Author(s): Jerome S Blackman
Publisher: Routledge
Publication Year: 2013

"Therapists inevitably feel more gratified in their work when their cases have better treatment outcomes. This book is designed to help them achieve that by providing practical solutions to problems that arise in psychotherapy, such as:

Do depressed people need an antidepressant, or psychotherapy alone? How do you handle people who want to be your “friend,” who touch you, who won’t leave your office, or who break boundaries? How do you prevent people from quitting treatment prematurely? Suppose you don’t like the person who consults you? What if people you treat with CBT don’t do their homework? When do you explain defense mechanisms, and when do you use supportive approaches?

Award-winning professor, Jerome Blackman, answers these and many other tricky problems for psychotherapists. Dr. Blackman punctuates his lively text with tips and snippets of various theories that apply to psychotherapy. He shares his advice and illustrates his successes and failures in diagnosis, treatment, and supervision. He highlights fundamental, fascinating, and perplexing problems he has encountered over decades of practicing and supervising therapy." from Routledge, https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415888929

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2013

Long Island Clinical Practitioners Association, NY

Author(s): Christian J. Churchill
Co-Authors: Gerald E. Levy
Publisher: Temple University Press
Publication Year: 2012

An ethnographic, sociological analysis of the purpose and practice of education in America. We use three case studies—a liberal arts college, a boarding school, and a Job Corps center—to illustrate how class, bureaucratic, and secular-religious dimensions of education prepare youth for participation in American foreign and domestic policy at all levels. Exploring how youth and their educators encounter the complexities of ideology and bureaucracy in school, this book explores the flawed redemptive relationship between education and society in the United States. Paradoxically, these three schools studied prepare students to participate in a society whose values they oppose.

Perspectives on Psychoanalysis, Personal History, and Trauma
Author(s): Marion Michel Oliner
Publisher: Karnac
Publication Year: 2012-08-28

This book skillfully combines autobiographical stories with clear psychoanalytical theories. During her childhood, the author experienced the Holocaust and was left understandly traumatised by it. It was her desire to confront this trauma that led her to psychoanalysis. For decades, the coherence of psychoanalysis seemed to be threatened by the conflicting thinking of many psychoanalytical colleagues about trauma and trauma affect, and also about the influence of external reality on the psychic reality discovered by Freud. However, Marion Oliner counters this potential conflict with her innovative theoretical integration, combined with remarkable conceptual outcomes and treatment techniques.

Author(s): Jerome S Blackman
Publisher: Synergy 16:1-7
Publication Year: 2011
Learning Psychodynamic Concepts from Life
Author(s): Kerry Malawista, Anne Adelman, & Catherine Anderson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Publication Year: 2011
A Re-Examination and Re-Application of the Psychoanalytic Assessment for Older Adults
Author(s): Carola Chase
Publisher: Volume 62, Psychoanalytic Study of the Child - Yale University Press
Publication Year: 2011
Voyeurism and erotomania in the films, ""Peeping Tom" and "Fatal Attractions"
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Presentation Year: 2011

Meetings of the American Psychological Association
Discussion group, "Sex and theAmerian Psyche" led by Curtis Bristol

True and false dichotomies
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: The Psychoanalytic Review, 98:613-632
Publication Year: 2011
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Presentation Year: 2010

Paper presented at the Psychoanalytic Cnter of Philadelphia

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman
Presentation Year: 2010

The Contemporary Freudian Society

Author(s): Gediman, H.K..
Presentation Year: 2010

The American Psychoanalytic Association, Curtis Bristol, Moderator, Discussion Group on Self Psychology

Author(s): Schechter, DS, Willheim E, Hinojosa C, Scholfield-Kleinman, K, Turner JB, McCaw J, Zeanah CH, Myers MM
Publisher: Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes, 73(2), 130-144
Publication Year: 2010
Assessment and Treatment Selection for Mental Disorders
Author(s): Jerome S Blackman
Publisher: Routledge
Publication Year: 2010

Get the Diagnosis Right explains how to make an accurate diagnosis when people have emotional problems. The DSM manuals contain collections of symptoms and complaints that can be organized to form a preliminary diagnosis. The observer, however, can do more than collect and arrange complaints. Assessment should also be done regarding deficits in important mental functions (including organizing thought and checking reality), in basic capacities for containing emotions and impulses, in abilities to sustain close relationships, and in the intactness of the conscience. If deficits are not found, then internal conflicts among wishes, guilt, emotions, and defense mechanisms become more important.

Get the Diagnosis Right is divided into two sections: "Part I: The Quick and Dirty" and "Part II: The Rest of the Story." Part I, about 50 pages, sets out the major concepts necessary to determine what type of treatment a person with emotional problems should obtain. Part II, about 200 pages, enlarges on Part I, giving more detail and discussing the complications. Both Sections include a template for completing an evaluation, along with charts, tables, clinical examples, and references for further study.

Author(s): E
Presentation Year: 2009

International Psychoanalytical Association Annual Mtg, Chicago, IL

Presentation Year: 2009

Tucson Psychoanalytic Society, John Rosegrant, Moderator

Author(s): Steven Demby, Ph.D.
Publisher: Routledge
Publication Year: 2009

The concept of parental conflict, as it is used in the custody evaluation literature, rarely conveys the motivational complexity of chronic parental acrimony. The concept of pathological hatred better describes and explains why some parents continue bitter fighting years after their divorce. Kernberg’s classificatory schema of pathological hatred is applied to high-conflict divorces in which such hatred may be viewed as an effort to destroy, while at the same time desperately needing, the other parent. Difficulties mourning the lost marital relationship, stemming from either character pathology or childhood trauma, create a fertile breeding ground for pathological hatred. The concept of parental competence is also frequently oversimplified in the custody evaluation literature, where it is viewed as an assortment of unrelated skills. From a psychoanalytic perspective, the capacity for parenting is viewed as an outgrowth of a parent’s object relationships, defensive structure, ego functioning, superego functioning, and unresolved developmental conflicts. Pathological hatred of the other parent tends to erode the parent’s capacity for nurturance, as the parent sacrifices support of the child’s developmental needs to the goal of making the child a pawn in the interparental hatred.

The negative impact on the child’s development can be insidious. An understanding of pathological hatred in high-conflict divorce enables the forensic custody evaluator to assist courts in making appropriate recommendations for therapeutic intervention, as well as custodial and visitation plans that have the potential to ameliorate or at least contain the damaging impact of the interparent hostilities on the child’s development.

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2008

American Psychoanalytical Association Annual Mtg, NY

Author(s): Christian J. Churchill
Publisher: The Candidate Journal
Publication Year: 2007
Author(s): Hadassah Ramin
Publisher: Round Robin, Vol. XXII, No.1, Winter 2007
Publication Year: 2007

The adoption experience, even under the best circumstances, may leave its mark on all stages of development. When it occurs after multiple placements, at eighteen months of age, it is bound to have a detrimental effect on the psychic structure of the child. This paper will focus on the impact of this primary rejection, compounded by subsequent ones, on the self esteem, superego, and identity formation of a woman who began analysis in her late thirties. It will show how the analysis helped modify her psychic structure, thus facilitating her ability to utilize a specific family romance fantasy that ushered in a movement from self representation of a cockroach to that of a woman.

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2006

Division 39, Psychoanalysis, the American Psychological Association, Philadelphia

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2006

Karen Horney Institute, New York City

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2006

International Conference on Creativity, Paris, France

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Dialogues
Publication Year: 2006

pp 16, 241-263.

Reply to commentaries, same issue, pp 305-316

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Publisher: Round Robin, Newsletter of the Ameican Psychological Association
Publication Year: 2006
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Publication Year: 2005

p 53

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2005

Joint International Conference, "Power and its Discontent," Cape Town, South Africa

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD and Panel Members: Adrienne Harris, Nancy Chodorow
Presentation Year: 2004

Division 39, Psychoanalysis, the American Psychological Association, Miami Beach

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Publication Year: 2003

pp 51, 1060-1066

In: Sexual Faces, Ed. C. Schwartz & M. Schulman
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: New York: International Universities Press
Publication Year: 2003

pp 93-114

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Presentation Year: 2003

American Psychoanalytical Association Annual Mtg, Boston, MA

Author(s): Ellen Sinkman, LCSW
Publisher: Newletter of the National Membership Committee on Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 2003
Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2003

Discussant: Adrienne Harris, American Psychoanalytic Association, Boston

How the Mind Shields Itself
Author(s): Jerome S Blackman
Publisher: Routledge
Publication Year: 2003

"Defenses are mental operations that restore or maintain psychic equilibrium when people feel that they cannot manage emotions that stem from conflict; they remove components of unpleasant emotions from conscious awareness. For example, using sex, food, or hostility to relieve tension - that's a defense - catalogued here as entry number 68: Impulsivity. Screaming at someone can be a defense. Playing golf can be a defense. So can saving money. Or at least all of these activities may involve defenses. In this book, Blackman catalogs 101 defenses - the most ever compiled - with descriptions practical for use in everyday assessment and treatment of psychopathology. He explains how to detect and interpret a defense and offers supportive therapy techniques. The many practical tips interspersed throughout this text make it an excellent reference tool for students and experienced clinicians, while the user-friendly features allow all readers to experience how psychological defenses operate in everyday life." From https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415946957

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 2002

pp 83, 478-482

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2002

Section I Division 39, the American Psychological Association, Kansas City

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2002

IPA 5 Societies "Conference on 9/11," New York City

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2001

George Washington University, Washington, DC

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 2001

New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York City

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Psychology
Publication Year: 2001

pp 18, 602-611

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Publication Year: 2001

pp 49, 733-737

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 2000

pp 81, 799-802

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1998

- American Psychological Association, Boston, 1998
- IPA, Santiago, Chile, 1999

In: C.S. Ellman et al, Eds., The Modern Freudians: Contemporary Psychoanalytic Technique
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Northvale, New Jersey: Jason Aronson
Publication Year: 1998
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 1998
Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1997

Fourth Joint International Conference International Conference, Florence, Italy

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Psychology
Publication Year: 1997

pp 14, 211-220

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1996

Panel, NYU Postdoctoral Program, Harriman, NY

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1996

Panel, "The Changing Perspectives on the Therapeutic Relationship," NYU Postdoctoral Program Freudian Track Faculty Conference, Freudian Psychoanalysis Today: Freud, Klein, Winnicott, and Beyond, New York City

Author(s): Gediman, H.K. & Lieberman, J.S.
Publisher: Northvale, New Jersey and London: Jason Aronson, Inc.
Publication Year: 1996
A Psychoanalytic Study of the Normal and the Pathological 

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Publisher: Jason Aronson, Inc.
Publication Year: 1996

Love and death are prevalent motifs in legend, art, literature, and opera, as well as in the fantasies of most people. In art and life, the love/death archetype transcends culture, time, and geography. This book addresses two kinds of fantasies of love and death, one the passionate wish to die together with a loved one, the other the desire to extend one's life—and loves—after death. Illustrating how these love/death phenomena span a continuum from the normal to the pathological, Helen Gediman delves into the psychoanalytic meanings of these fantasies and motifs, as embedded in the arts, as well as in the human psyche.

Omissions, Lies, and Disguise in Psychotherapy
Author(s): Gediman, H.K. & Lieberman, J.S.
Publisher: Jason Aronson, Inc.
Publication Year: 1996

This work examines the concept of deceit and its ubiquity both in everyday life and in various forms of psychopathology. It offers examples of clinical work with true impostors, those with imposturous tendencies, and those who fear they are impostors when in fact they are not.

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD and Janice S. Lieberman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1996

New York Freudian Society, New York City

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1996

New York Freudian Society, Washington DC Program, Bethesda, Maryland

A Psychoanalytic Study of the Normal and the Pathological
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: New York University Press
Publication Year: 1995
Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1994

Discussion of panel presentations by Steven Ellman and Warren Poland, Section I Symposium, Division 39 Spring Meeting, Washington DC

Imposture, illusion and dénouement in the play, "M. Butterfly."
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Psychology
Publication Year: 1993

pp 10, 469-479

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1993

Discussion of paper presented by Phyllis Tyson, American Psychoanalytic Association, San Francisco

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1992

New York Freudian Society, New York City

Complemental intrapsychic and interpersonal perspectives on fantasy and reality
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Psychology
Publication Year: 1991

pp 8, 381-401

In: H. Siegel et al, Eds., Psychoanalytic Reflections on Current Issues
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: New York University Press
Publication Year: 1990
Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1990

Division 39, American Psychological Association, New York City

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1990

Conference on “Love,” The Washington School of Psychiatry, Washington, DC

In: D. Detrick and S. Detrick, Eds., Self Psychology: Comparisons and Contrasts
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Hillsdale, N.J.: The Analytic Press
Publication Year: 1989
Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1987

New York Freudian Society, New York City

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1987

Forum for Psychoanalysis and the Arts, Orvieto, Italy

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1986

Washington DC Program of the New York Freudian Society, Colloquium, Washington DC

Learning amidst the pressures and pulls of power in the institute
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Inquiry
Publication Year: 1986

pp 6, 67-91

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Publication Year: 1985

pp 33, 911-935

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1984

American Psychoanalytic Association, New York City

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 1984

pp 65, 191-202

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1984

Freudian Track Colloquium Series of the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York City

The experience of deficit in neurotic compromise formation
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 1983

pp 64, 59-70

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Review of Psychoanalytic Books
Publication Year: 1983

pp 3 & 4, 415-428

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1983

American Psychoanalytic Association, New York City

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Review
Publication Year: 1982

pp 69, 391-399

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Review of Psychoanalytic Books
Publication Year: 1982

p 2

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1982

Discussion at Symposium on Analyzability, New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York City

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1982

American Psychoanalytic Association, New York City

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Review
Publication Year: 1981

pp 67, 505-514

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Publication Year: 1981

pp 29, 607-630

its reconsideration as a triadic system
Author(s): Gediman, H.K., and Wolkenfeld, F.
Publisher: The Psychoanalytic Quarterly
Publication Year: 1980

pp 59, 234-255

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD and Fred Wolkenfeld, PhD
Presentation Year: 1977

International Forum of Psychoanalysis, Berlin, Germany

Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Publication Year: 1975

pp 23, 407-423

Author(s): Bellak, L., Hurvich, M., and Gediman, H. K.
Publisher: New York: Wiley
Publication Year: 1973
Its review and reformulation as an adaptive ego function
Author(s): Gediman, H.K.
Publisher: International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Publication Year: 1971

pp 52, 243-257

Author(s): Helen K. Gediman, PhD and Janice Lieberman, PhD
Presentation Year: 1966

Metropolitan Institute for Training in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, New York City

Author(s): Elizabeth Thorne PhD and Shirley Herscovitch Schaye PhD
Publisher: Charles C Thomas

Psychoanalysis Today: A Case Book addresses the two issues currently of major concern in the field of psychoanalysis. The different theoretical models, and the need for more case material in the literature. Thus, the main theme for the 5th. I.P.A . Congress of Training Analysts is on Problems in the Integration of Different Theoretical Frameworks in the Formation of the Psychoanalyst. Klumpner and Frank (J.A.P.A. 1991, Vol. 21) state that after reviewing papers from the leading journals, “ not a single one of the fifteen papers included any significant amount of primary clinical data! … we found no verbatim examples and only one dream fragment … we also believe that case reports … remain our most compelling means of communicating these clinical findings.” Meeting these concerns, Psychoanalysis Today: A Case Book contains in-depth studies of cases highlighting the leading analytic models of personality and the typical working styles associated with each: classical theory, object relations, ego psychology, and self psychology. Cases showing an analyst weaving a tapestry of several models with the same patient are also included. Psychoanalytic literature contains many summaries of clinical case material, but details of the actual work of the analyst are extremely rare. Psychoanalysis Today: A Case Book will help fill that gap. Here are in-depth discussions of work with a single individual followed over time, demonstrating personal change and how it occurs. Abstract concepts come vividly to life. These cases are focused on the shared experience of the patient and the analyst. They tell the story of that experience and its effect on the patient’s life both inside and outside the consulting room. There are many voices in this book. The reader can contrast different styles; different assumptions; a whole range of viewpoints. This book will be of particular value to students. There is no comparable source for seeing just how mentors work. Also, practicing psychoanalysts and psychotherapists will find a chance to study the work of their colleagues in close detail. This is a pleasure quite unavailable in the daily rush of professional life. Programs in psychology, social work and other behavioral sciences, as well as schools of medicine, will use this book as a text or supplementary source. It is an invaluable reference tool for libraries. This book has mass appeal as well: the reader will learn about those forces leading us to feel and act as we do. There is the drama of seeing lives unfold. We see how the actual events between analyst and patient, evolving over time, gradually and with much difficulty, bring liberating changes in the patient’s experience of life.

Co-Authors: Louis Lauro, PhD; Alan Bass, PhD; Lisa A. Goldsmith, PhD; Judy Ann Kaplan, MSW, BCD; Gil Katz, PhD; and Shirley Herscovitch Schaye, PhD
Publisher: Psychoanalytic Quarterly, LXXII,

Control cases from the broad group of non-neurotic but potentially analyzable patients appear with increasing frequency. The intense, complex transferences they develop place great stress on the psychoanalytic relationship and evoke marked countertransference reactions in psychoanalytic candidates, which reverberate within the supervisory relationship. Through application of a case study method, common themes emerge in the candidate-supervisor dyad: idealization of the supervisor and of classical technique, identification with the patient, parallel process enactments, difficulty maintaining the analytic frame, and the importance of concurrent training analysis. Classical supervisory techniques must be adapted to the “difficult” ( non-neurotic ) control case. Complex countertransference issues must be carefully addressed while maintaining the teach/treat boundary.

Author(s): Ani Buk
Publisher: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Elsevier Inc.

Using nodal sessions in the case of a profoundly traumatized woman as an illustrative foundation, this paper explores the mutative actions of psychoanalytically informed art therapy interventions. The efficacy of these interventions, which range from subtle to active, is supported by current research in the fields of neurobiology, infant development, cognitive science, and psychoanalysis. Focus is given to the continuum of dissociation as a survival response to overwhelming trauma, the relationship of dissociative processes to implicit memory, the mirror neuron system, and embodied simulation, as well as ways that the therapist’s sensitivity to the impact of trauma and dissociation on the survivor can be harnessed to promote the healing process.


Some Thoughts on the Need to consider Retirement
Author(s): Martin L. Nass, PhD
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