Resources

Evaluating Three Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Multiwave Study

2007 study by Clarkin, Levy, Lenzenweger & Kernberg comparing DBT, a structured transference-focused (i.e., psychodynamic) therapy and supportive therapy in the treatment of 90 patients diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. The researchers found that, while all three types of treatment were helpful, the transference-focused therapy was effective in the most domains that were measured (suicidality, irritability, anger, impulsivity, verbal assaultiveness

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Frontolimbic neural circuit changes in emotional processing and inhibitory control associated with clinical improvement following transference‐focused psychotherapy in borderline personality disorder

This study, just published in the journal Psychiatry and Neurosciences, shows dramatic neurological changes that occurred in response to a trial of psychoanalytic therapy (referred to as “transference-focused psychotherapy” with patients presenting with borderline personality disorder The changes in the brain that were identified correlated with improvements in psychological difficulties associated with borderline personality disorder, especially “affective lability” or the

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How to Beat Writer’s Block

In this very intelligently written piece in the New Yorker, Maria Konnikova discusses writer’s block and it’s psychological correlates. She notes that Graham Greene, while in psychotherapy, started a dream journal, something he would come back to to help him with his (infrequent) bouts of writer’s block. She describes research by Barrios and Singer on writer’s block that suggests that,

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How Trauma and Resilience Cross Generations: audio interview with neuropsychiatrist Dr. Rachel Yehuda on On Being with Krista Tippett

“There is a wisdom in our bodies.” About Dr. Yehuda’s study of epigenetics and the transmission of trauma from one generation to the next. Her studies on the children of Holocaust survivors as well as on the infants born to women who were pregnant during the attacks of September 11 revealed that the children of parents who’d been traumatized are,

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